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Ranked among the world’s top 25 consultants by Consulting magazine, Dr. Stefan Larsson is the global leader of The Boston Consulting Group’s health care payers and providers sector. His research focuses on the topic of value-based health care—that is, how transparency within health care outcomes and patient group costs will drive the transformation of health care systems and counter rising costs.

Since joining BCG in 1996, Stefan has worked extensively for clients across the health care industry on issues of strategy, organizational redesign, operational effectiveness, R&D effectiveness, regulatory issues, drug safety, manufacturing, in-licensing strategy, and commercial compliance. His acclaimed TED Talk “What Doctors Can Learn from Each Other” spotlights how healthcare workers can lower expenses by focusing on providing quality care rather than inventing ways to cut budgets.

Stefan is also BCG's representative to a new collaboration, the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM), cofounded by BCG, Michael Porter of the Harvard Business School, and the Karolinska Institute. He has published 22 articles in peer-reviewed international journals.

Full Profile

Stefan Larsson is a senior partner and managing director in BCG’s Stockholm office. He is the global leader of BCG’s Health Care Payers and Providers sector.

Stefan has been a BCG Fellow since 2010. His research topic is value-based health care—how transparency on health care outcomes and patient group costs will drive the transformation of health care systems. He has presented a TED talk on the topic, “What Doctors Can Learn from Each Other,” as part of a series of talks curated by TED and BCG.

Health care costs represent 9 to 18 percent of GDP in the developed world and they have risen two to three times faster than economic growth over the past 20 years. For two decades, governments and other payers have focused on managing costs, an approach that has had limited success.

BCG is exploring a concept called value-based health care (VBHC), introduced in a 2006 book titled Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results by Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg, which provides a new framework to guide effective health care reform.

Comprehensive registries of health outcomes for major patient groups are the backbone of the value-based approach. They enable clinical expert communities to convene to understand differences in performance of different providers and learn from each other—ultimately to address health care value and, for the first time, provide the platform for an alignment of strategic goals for payers, providers, and suppliers.

Before joining BCG, Stefan was an associate professor at the Karolinska Institute. He has published 22 articles in peer-reviewed international journals.

Stefan holds an MD from Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm. He also completed his PhD studies at KI and Harvard Medical School.


Stefan Larsson Speaker Videos Back to top

Stefan Larsson-What doctors can learn from each other


Upon taking a sabbatical from his consulting career and donning his white doctor’s coat for the first time in 17 years, Stefan Larsson discovered that the brightest most engaged doctors he knew had become cynical and their conversations were dominated by inventing ways to downsize hospital budgets and curtail growing expenses. Amidst all this despair he began to ponder how the healthcare sector could shift its focus back to putting the patient first.

He discusses how his organization, BCG, took a step back to focus on quality-value health care over costs. Their research revealed a wide variation of quality among hospitals. For example, if Stefan’s father who suffers from cancer were to receive treatment at an average German hospital he would have a 50% chance of becoming incontinent; however, if he were to receive treatment at a specific clinic in Hamburg, that probability dropped to 20% solely because of the quality of care.

Stefan points out that if doctors and nurses act as agents of change and concentrate more on raising the quality of care, costs would be reduced as a natural consequence. “If the American healthcare system would focus more on measuring quality, and raise quality just to the level of the average set by the OECD, it would save the American people 500 billion U.S. dollars a year,” he shares. “That's 20 percent of the healthcare budget of the country.”


Speeches / Speaking Engagements Back to top


Internationally renowned researcher and doctor, Stefan Larsson shows how health care management that engages the profession can lead to dramatic improvement in health care outcomes. Illustrating that different hospitals produce drastically different results according to the quality of care, Stefan looks at what happens when doctors measure and share their outcomes, put patients first, and focus less on budgets.

Stefan’s expertise spans:
  • Corporate strategy in biopharma and hospitals
  • Clinical development
  • Hospital organization and transformation
  • Models of care
  • Clinical development
  • Cost of care and medical management




* Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

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Stefan’s expertise spans:
  • Corporate strategy in biopharma and hospitals
  • Clinical development
  • Hospital organization and transformation
  • Models of care
  • Clinical development
  • Cost of care and medical management


Stefan Larsson-What doctors can learn from each other


Upon taking a sabbatical from his consulting career and donning his white doctor’s coat for the first time in 17 years, Stefan Larsson discovered that the brightest most engaged doctors he knew had become cynical and their conversations were dominated by inventing ways to downsize hospital budgets and curtail growing expenses. Amidst all this despair he began to ponder how the healthcare sector could shift its focus back to putting the patient first.

He discusses how his organization, BCG, took a step back to focus on quality-value health care over costs. Their research revealed a wide variation of quality among hospitals. For example, if Stefan’s father who suffers from cancer were to receive treatment at an average German hospital he would have a 50% chance of becoming incontinent; however, if he were to receive treatment at a specific clinic in Hamburg, that probability dropped to 20% solely because of the quality of care.

Stefan points out that if doctors and nurses act as agents of change and concentrate more on raising the quality of care, costs would be reduced as a natural consequence. “If the American healthcare system would focus more on measuring quality, and raise quality just to the level of the average set by the OECD, it would save the American people 500 billion U.S. dollars a year,” he shares. “That's 20 percent of the healthcare budget of the country.”