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Author of the book Political Malpractice: How the Politicians Made a Mess of Healthcare, Stan Hupfeld served 15 years as the President and CEO of Oklahoma’s largest healthcare system, INTEGRIS. His track record for excellence in healthcare administration makes him a sought-out speaker on healthcare reform and leadership, especially in light of the Affordable Care Act.

Mr. Hupfeld began his medical career as a surgical assistant on the battlefields of the Vietnam War. Inspired by the difference he was able to make in the lives of the medics he managed and the soldiers he saved, he enrolled in a graduate program for healthcare administration at Trinity University. By age 27, he was a hospital CEO.

During his watch at INTEGRIS, Mr. Hupfeld oversaw the merger of different healthcare providers, the launching of an organ transplant program, and an artificial heart program. As a community leader, he and INTEGRIS took charge of an Oklahoma City school with a 100% poverty rate, making it the first charter elementary school in Oklahoma and the first one in the country to be administered by a hospital. The school’s academic performance improved so much that it was renamed the Stan Hupfeld Academy at West Village.

Currently, Mr. Hupfeld serves as Senior Consultant at INTEGRIS in addition to making various appearances on broadcast and cable news outlets. His work can be read frequently on his blog, blog.stanhupfeld.com and in a local business daily The Journal Record.

Full Profile

Effective July 1, 1995, Stanley Hupfeld became President and Chief Executive Officer of INTEGRIS Health, an integrated delivery system composed of INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, INTEGRIS Southwest Medical Center, and INTEGRIS Rural Health. The System comprises 13 hospitals, all in Oklahoma. Annual net revenues of the System are over $l.3 billion with 1600 beds. Hupfeld was President and Chief Executive Officer of Oklahoma Healthcare Corporation and Baptist Medical Center of Oklahoma from March 1987 to that time. Effective January 1, 2010 he transitioned to Chairman of the INTEGRIS Family of Foundations, and currently is Senior Consultant at INTEGRIS Health. Mr. Hupfeld also served as President of All Saints Healthcare in Fort Worth, Texas from 1977 to 1987.

Mr. Hupfeld is a former member of the Board of Directors of the American Hospital Association and has served as Chairman of the AHA’s Regional Policy Board (7). He has served as a Health Care Systems delegate and alternate delegate and Metro section alternate delegate on the Section for Metropolitan Hospitals Governing Council. He has served as Chairman of the Coalition to Project America’s Health Care Board and as fund-raising Co-Chair. He has served as the Campaign Chairman and Chairman of the Board of the United Way in both Fort Worth and Oklahoma City. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, and has served as Chairman of the Board in 1994; Chairman-Elect in 1993; and Vice Chairman from 1990 through 1992. He is a trustee on numerous other Boards and commissions in Oklahoma.

Mr. Hupfeld was a member of the 1963 National Championship Football Team — the University of Texas in Austin.

He has spoken and been published widely, and was honored as “CEO Marketer of the Year” by the American Society for Healthcare Planning and Marketing, and as “Executive of the Year” by the Sales & Marketing Executives International. He is the 2003 recipient of the W. Cleveland Rodgers Distinguished Service Award for outstanding service to the health care industry. He was honored in 2007 with one of the American Hospital Association’s highest honors, The Award of Honor, and is also the recipient of the Friends of Nursing Award from the Oklahoma Nurses Association.

As the driving force of the nation’s first hospital-sponsored charter school, Hupfeld was honored in 2009 when the INTEGRIS Health Board of Directors voted to rename the school The Stanley Hupfeld Academy at Western Village. He currently writes a healthcare column for a local business daily, The Journal Record.

He is a native of Dallas, Texas, with an undergraduate degree in History from the University of Texas in Austin, and a Masters of Science in Healthcare Administration from Trinity University. He has been honored by Trinity University as an outstanding graduate. He served as an Administrative Resident at Providence Hospital in El Paso, Texas and subsequently was the first lay-President of St. Joseph Hospital of El Paso, Texas (1973 – 1977).

He and his wife Suzie have three married children, and six grandchildren.


Stan Hupfeld Speaker Videos Back to top

Stan Hupfeld, Healthcare Speaker: TEDx Talk


Stan Hupfeld tackles the hotly contested Affordable Care Act from the perspective of a healthcare services manager, explaining what’s feasible, what’s not, and alternative ways to resolve “the most complex domestic issue of our time.” Putting political bias aside, he makes the case that ultimately, politicians – the majority of whom have absolutely no experience caring for patients or running a medical service – have lost their focus when it comes to reforming healthcare; the changes they have made do not help the “25% of Americans who need affordable care the most.”

He describes “Lucy,” a single mother of three who works at McDonald’s, the best job she can get. She is uninsured, not by fault of her own, and earns a meager salary of $12,000 per year, putting her family below the poverty line but above the income limits needed to qualify for Medicaid.

“I believe we’ve got to get back to the “Lucys” in this world,” Mr. Hupfeld proclaims. “We have to figure out a way that in this very rich society we don’t ignore Lucy. Lucy is not a ne’er-do-well living in a box under a bridge. She is an American citizen, paying pay role taxes and paying property taxes through her rent.”

Stan Hupfeld, Healthcare Speaker: Keynote



Speeches / Speaking Engagements Back to top


Respected for his insider take on healthcare reform, Stan Hupfeld shares his experiences as a CEO, Marketer, and Planner across the healthcare system. Illustrating his points with relatable examples and a down-to-earth wit, his talks are deeply informative while injecting a much-needed vigor into a topic that too often becomes weighed down by myth and dry details.

Mr. Hupfeld sweeps past the political talking points that cloud the public’s understanding of how doctors, the healthcare system, and insurance really work as he informs audiences about the effects of healthcare reform and its effectiveness within the current system.

Healthcare Leadership in a Post Reform World

Historically, health care delivery has tended to be transactional and unidirectional - in other words one doctor, one hospital stay, one insurance bill. Now in a post reform world all bets are off, it requires a different kind of thinking when we begin to take a risk (read premium dollar) for the total care of a patient population - a different approach when we have to accept a single payment for an episode of care and then split that payment among several providers.

In that environment we must be much shrewder and have a different approach with the other stakeholders. We certainly need to understand why health care seems to defy our best thinking about how to change it and what policy alternatives give us the best hope of survival.

In this keynote, Stan Hupfeld invites leaders to hear his somewhat provocative thoughts that will stimulate discussion and encourage leaders to think outside the box as never before! His keynote will center around “everything is different” and examines the following:

  • Payment – population health versus fee for service
  • Narrow margins – waiting lines
  • The government (not the market) determines medical technology
  • Dying becomes acceptable
  • Extreme budget control
  • Massive consolidations – 10 to 15 national systems control health care
  • Women and medical professionals as leaders - 75% of health care workforces are female
  • Business skills less important than clinical skills - thin margins lead to labor issues What doesn’t change?
  • Ability to empathize with patients and care givers
  • Sense of humor in tough times
  • Focus on care delivery process
  • A love of the work

    Surviving In a Post Reform World
    It Isn't Rocket Science But We May Need Spock!

    Using the “Spock theme” with slides and video, Stan Hupfeld is able to emphasize the lack of logic in the post reform world. In today’s health care world the only voices that seem to carry any weight are the ideologues of both political persuasions. Absent are the cold hard facts of medical care delivery and organizing as witnessed and experienced by medical providers. Stan takes the approach through our friend, Spock, who was always amused by our tendency to let our emotions and our vested interest govern our reaction to any intense personal experience.

    While reforming health care is admittedly complex it does not measure up to the complexities experienced by social scientists in other areas. Stan calls on our friend Spock, and delivers how he would advise the reformation of our health system. Using only Vulcan logic how would he recommend mere mortals devise a system consistent with the resources available, and the limitations of human science to best meet the needs of the American public.

    The necessary ingredients that seem to be missing from the reform debate are logic and facts. Perhaps a trip on the Starship Enterprise to recapture the spirit of the half human/half Vulcan Spock and to divorce ourselves from illogical partisan politics is the only way to make substantial progress on a complex problem filled with emotion.

    This keynote begins with a discussion of what drives our current system, including:

  • Money
  • Prestige
  • Culture
  • Litigation

    Stan continues with the dilemmas of our current situation:

  • Does money give us rights or advantages over others?
  • Healthcare – Is it a right or privilege? Is it a business or a social service?

    Aging is Not for the Faint of Heart!

    In preparing for this keynote, Stan Hupfeld talked with a number of people and most agreed they would like to live into their 90’s in relatively good health with all their mental faculties, excited to get up every morning, able to contribute to some cause, relevant to someone or some thing, and then depart quietly in their sleep.

    We all know people who have achieved these goals, but unfortunately there are many more whose life ended in a nursing home or a memory unit. Stan likes to quote the old saying, “The rest of the world views death as inevitable…Americans view it as optional.” While a bit overdone, he remarks there is some truth in this comment. It is a well-known fact that, as Americans, we spend an extraordinary amount of money on healthcare in the final months of our lives. It has been estimated that one-half of our lifetime health expenditures will be spent in the last six months of our lives.

    As a culture, our inability to deal with death logically exacerbates cost problems and limits our ability to have a serious discussion about end-of-life issues. He strongly believes we simply have to get the dying thing right. Medicare now spends 25 percent of its budget on care delivered in the last year of the beneficiary’s life. Of that, 40 percent is spent during the last 30 days. Decisions are routinely made that have nothing to do with dying with dignity, to say nothing of the costs incurred by an already negative balance sheet.

    Invite Stan to create an environment based in love and compassion for the elderly – and a discussion about end-of-life decisions directed by healthcare professionals, family and community, rather than being a wedge in the next election cycle. A customized program will be delivered focusing on questions such as:

  • What do we want our lives to look like as we age?
  • What would be the ultimate end game as we approach the last quarter of our lives?
  • What can be done to bridge the gap?
  • What are clever ways to keep seniors engaged, relevant, and productive members of society?
  • What about tax incentives for the elderly to encourage them to volunteer their expertise and professional services?
  • How do other countries handle aging and end-of-life?
  • Why the disconnect between other county’s views of aging and what transpires in this country?

    He invites additional questions that are of interest to the audience.



  • Stan Hupfeld Speaker Testimonials Back to top

    "You could never be a state or national elected official. Reason? You have too much good, logical sense."
    - Jerry McPeak, OK State Rep - House District 13

    "From the audience's reaction at the Governor's Conference on Aging, "You clearly hit it out of the park."
    - Terry Cline, Ph.D., OK Commissioner of Health

    "...was marvelous and well received. Bringing the issues facing seniors is important to Oklahoma."
    - Gayle Semtner, MEd, Community Development Specialist, Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    "I invited Mr. Hupfeld to speak at the annual meeting of the Illinois Hospital Association. He highlighted the key concepts in his book to senior leaders as well as board members. His insight and presentation resulted in significant discussions among our board. I highly encourage any group to hear Stan review what needs to be done in healthcare."
    - David L. Schreiner, FACHE President/CEO - KSB Hospital

    "Stan Hupfeld is a nationally recognized healthcare CEO, author, community leader and one fantastic speaker. Stan has a deep and rich understanding of healthcare and a unique ability to explain it in a simple way. I have hired Stan to speak to my organization, and have seen him speak on multiple occasions. Every time the audience loved him, and I highly recommend him."
    - W. Hays Waldrop, President and CEO - The Institute of Healthcare Executives and Suppliers

    "Stan Hupfeld peels away the political rhetoric that clouds the debate surrounding health care reform."
    - Mary Stefl, PhD, Department of Health Care Administration - Trinity University




    * Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

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    "You could never be a state or national elected official. Reason? You have too much good, logical sense."
    - Jerry McPeak, OK State Rep - House District 13

    "From the audience's reaction at the Governor's Conference on Aging, "You clearly hit it out of the park."
    - Terry Cline, Ph.D., OK Commissioner of Health

    "...was marvelous and well received. Bringing the issues facing seniors is important to Oklahoma."
    - Gayle Semtner, MEd, Community Development Specialist, Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    "I invited Mr. Hupfeld to speak at the annual meeting of the Illinois Hospital Association. He highlighted the key concepts in his book to senior leaders as well as board members. His insight and presentation resulted in significant discussions among our board. I highly encourage any group to hear Stan review what needs to be done in healthcare."
    - David L. Schreiner, FACHE President/CEO - KSB Hospital

    "Stan Hupfeld is a nationally recognized healthcare CEO, author, community leader and one fantastic speaker. Stan has a deep and rich understanding of healthcare and a unique ability to explain it in a simple way. I have hired Stan to speak to my organization, and have seen him speak on multiple occasions. Every time the audience loved him, and I highly recommend him."
    - W. Hays Waldrop, President and CEO - The Institute of Healthcare Executives and Suppliers

    "Stan Hupfeld peels away the political rhetoric that clouds the debate surrounding health care reform."
    - Mary Stefl, PhD, Department of Health Care Administration - Trinity University


    Political Malpractice

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - or 'Obamacare' as its opponents derisively refer to it - is either the greatest piece of social legislation in the history of the United States or it is an abomination inflicted on the American public that will ultimately destroy our health system. Insider Stanley Hupfeld dissects that health system and exposes the fallacies and prejudices of both political parties. Mr. Hupfeld explains that, if we are willing to make hard choices, we can indeed cover the uninsured, control costs, and not bankrupt the country.

    Healthcare Leadership in a Post Reform World

    Historically, health care delivery has tended to be transactional and unidirectional - in other words one doctor, one hospital stay, one insurance bill. Now in a post reform world all bets are off, it requires a different kind of thinking when we begin to take a risk (read premium dollar) for the total care of a patient population - a different approach when we have to accept a single payment for an episode of care and then split that payment among several providers.

    In that environment we must be much shrewder and have a different approach with the other stakeholders. We certainly need to understand why health care seems to defy our best thinking about how to change it and what policy alternatives give us the best hope of survival.

    In this keynote, Stan Hupfeld invites leaders to hear his somewhat provocative thoughts that will stimulate discussion and encourage leaders to think outside the box as never before! His keynote will center around “everything is different” and examines the following:

  • Payment – population health versus fee for service
  • Narrow margins – waiting lines
  • The government (not the market) determines medical technology
  • Dying becomes acceptable
  • Extreme budget control
  • Massive consolidations – 10 to 15 national systems control health care
  • Women and medical professionals as leaders - 75% of health care workforces are female
  • Business skills less important than clinical skills - thin margins lead to labor issues What doesn’t change?
  • Ability to empathize with patients and care givers
  • Sense of humor in tough times
  • Focus on care delivery process
  • A love of the work

    Surviving In a Post Reform World
    It Isn't Rocket Science But We May Need Spock!

    Using the “Spock theme” with slides and video, Stan Hupfeld is able to emphasize the lack of logic in the post reform world. In today’s health care world the only voices that seem to carry any weight are the ideologues of both political persuasions. Absent are the cold hard facts of medical care delivery and organizing as witnessed and experienced by medical providers. Stan takes the approach through our friend, Spock, who was always amused by our tendency to let our emotions and our vested interest govern our reaction to any intense personal experience.

    While reforming health care is admittedly complex it does not measure up to the complexities experienced by social scientists in other areas. Stan calls on our friend Spock, and delivers how he would advise the reformation of our health system. Using only Vulcan logic how would he recommend mere mortals devise a system consistent with the resources available, and the limitations of human science to best meet the needs of the American public.

    The necessary ingredients that seem to be missing from the reform debate are logic and facts. Perhaps a trip on the Starship Enterprise to recapture the spirit of the half human/half Vulcan Spock and to divorce ourselves from illogical partisan politics is the only way to make substantial progress on a complex problem filled with emotion.

    This keynote begins with a discussion of what drives our current system, including:

  • Money
  • Prestige
  • Culture
  • Litigation

    Stan continues with the dilemmas of our current situation:

  • Does money give us rights or advantages over others?
  • Healthcare – Is it a right or privilege? Is it a business or a social service?

    Aging is Not for the Faint of Heart!

    In preparing for this keynote, Stan Hupfeld talked with a number of people and most agreed they would like to live into their 90’s in relatively good health with all their mental faculties, excited to get up every morning, able to contribute to some cause, relevant to someone or some thing, and then depart quietly in their sleep.

    We all know people who have achieved these goals, but unfortunately there are many more whose life ended in a nursing home or a memory unit. Stan likes to quote the old saying, “The rest of the world views death as inevitable…Americans view it as optional.” While a bit overdone, he remarks there is some truth in this comment. It is a well-known fact that, as Americans, we spend an extraordinary amount of money on healthcare in the final months of our lives. It has been estimated that one-half of our lifetime health expenditures will be spent in the last six months of our lives.

    As a culture, our inability to deal with death logically exacerbates cost problems and limits our ability to have a serious discussion about end-of-life issues. He strongly believes we simply have to get the dying thing right. Medicare now spends 25 percent of its budget on care delivered in the last year of the beneficiary’s life. Of that, 40 percent is spent during the last 30 days. Decisions are routinely made that have nothing to do with dying with dignity, to say nothing of the costs incurred by an already negative balance sheet.

    Invite Stan to create an environment based in love and compassion for the elderly – and a discussion about end-of-life decisions directed by healthcare professionals, family and community, rather than being a wedge in the next election cycle. A customized program will be delivered focusing on questions such as:

  • What do we want our lives to look like as we age?
  • What would be the ultimate end game as we approach the last quarter of our lives?
  • What can be done to bridge the gap?
  • What are clever ways to keep seniors engaged, relevant, and productive members of society?
  • What about tax incentives for the elderly to encourage them to volunteer their expertise and professional services?
  • How do other countries handle aging and end-of-life?
  • Why the disconnect between other county’s views of aging and what transpires in this country?

    He invites additional questions that are of interest to the audience.


  • Stan Hupfeld, Healthcare Speaker: TEDx Talk


    Stan Hupfeld tackles the hotly contested Affordable Care Act from the perspective of a healthcare services manager, explaining what’s feasible, what’s not, and alternative ways to resolve “the most complex domestic issue of our time.” Putting political bias aside, he makes the case that ultimately, politicians – the majority of whom have absolutely no experience caring for patients or running a medical service – have lost their focus when it comes to reforming healthcare; the changes they have made do not help the “25% of Americans who need affordable care the most.”

    He describes “Lucy,” a single mother of three who works at McDonald’s, the best job she can get. She is uninsured, not by fault of her own, and earns a meager salary of $12,000 per year, putting her family below the poverty line but above the income limits needed to qualify for Medicaid.

    “I believe we’ve got to get back to the “Lucys” in this world,” Mr. Hupfeld proclaims. “We have to figure out a way that in this very rich society we don’t ignore Lucy. Lucy is not a ne’er-do-well living in a box under a bridge. She is an American citizen, paying pay role taxes and paying property taxes through her rent.”

    Stan Hupfeld, Healthcare Speaker: Keynote