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An adviser to President Bush and his Cabinet as a member on the Council of Economic Advisers in the Executive Office of the President, a Senate confirmed position, Matthew J. Slaughter is an economic expert accustomed to working at the very highest levels. Other organizations to which he has provided his expertise include the Federal Reserve Board, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the McKinsey Global Institute and the Institute for International Economics.

Specializing in the economics and politics of globalization, Slaughter has recently been focusing on policy responses to the World Financial Crisis and related issues concerning multinational firms and international trade and investment. He has contributed to many books and been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals as well as presenting papers to many academic conferences and seminars. He is the co-author of a trio of books, which include The Squam Lake Report: Fixing the Financial System and Globalization and the Perceptions of American Workers.

Working with politicians across the spectrum, Slaughter is frequently called to testify to the US Congress, and in a private capacity is in great demand as both a speaker and a consultant for individual firms and industry organizations. His op-eds feature regularly in The Financial Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post, while BusinessWeek, The Economist, Newsweek and TIME often showcase his work. He is in high demand for media appearances, including on CNBCs Squawk Box, PBS's NewsHour and NPR's Morning Edition.

A summa cum laude graduate of Notre Dame, Slaughter took his doctorate from MIT. A former member of the economics faculty at Dartmouth, where he received the John M. Manley Huntington Teaching Award, Slaughter is now associate Dean for Faculty, Signal Companies' Professor of Management and faculty director of the Center for Global Business and Government at the Tuck School of Business, where he has received the Teaching Excellence Award. He also holds many distinguished US government advisory positions.

Full Profile

    At the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth Matthew J. Slaughter is associate dean for Faculty, Signal Companies’ Professor of Management and the founding faculty director of the Center for Global Business and Government. He is also currently a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Economic Advisers; a member of the U.S. State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy and a member of the academic advisory board of the International Tax Policy Forum.


    From 2005 to 2007, Slaughter served as a member on the Council of Economic Advisers in the Executive Office of the President. In this Senate-confirmed position he held the international portfolio, advising the President, the Cabinet, and many others on issues including international trade and investment, currency and energy markets and the competitiveness of the U.S. economy. He has also been affiliated with organizations including the Federal Reserve Board, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the McKinsey Global Institute and the Institute for International Economics.


    Slaughter’s area of expertise is the economics and politics of globalization. Much of his recent work has focused on policy responses to the World Financial Crisis; on the global operations of multinational firms and on the labor-market impacts of international trade and investment. His research has been supported by several grants from organizations including the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Slaughter has published dozens of articles as book chapters and in peer-reviewed journals; he has co-authored three books, including The Squam Lake Report: Fixing the Financial System and Globalization and the Perceptions of American Workers; he has served in editorial positions for several academic journals and he has presented at many academic conferences and seminars.


    Slaughter is a frequent keynote speaker to many audiences in the business and policy communities, and he frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress while working with leaders of both parties. He regularly contributes op-eds to The Financial Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post; his ideas are regularly featured in these outlets and others including BusinessWeek, The Economist, Newsweek and TIME. He is a guest on many TV and radio programs such as CNBC’s Squawk Box, PBS’s NewsHour and NPR’s Morning Edition. For many years he has consulted both to individual firms and also to industry organizations on a wide range of issues regarding the global economy. And at Tuck he co-directs the flagship executive-education program Global Leadership 2030.


    Prior to joining the Tuck faculty in 2002, since 1994 Slaughter had been on the faculty of the economics department at Dartmouth. In 2001, he received Dartmouth’s John M. Manley Huntington Teaching Award and in 2012 he received Tuck’s Class of 2011 Teaching Excellence Award. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Notre Dame in 1990 and his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994.


Matthew Slaughter Speaker Videos Back to top

Demo Video


“One of the best ways to support job growth in small businesses is to promote job growth in large businesses,” Matthew J. Slaughter explains to a House Committee, giving his views on the ways in which the US economy can be supported through the financial crisis in an era of increasing globalization. “Multinationals enhance the US economy through capital investment…and good paying jobs.”


Speeches / Speaking Engagements Back to top


Matthew J. Slaughter's speeches offer an unrivaled opportunity to tap into the views and expertise of someone who works at the very heart of US government as well as at the highest levels of academia. His knowledge of globalization issues is unrivaled and must not be missed by anyone affected by its issues.

Slaughter provides expert but easy to understand analysis of the pressing questions facing the US and the global economy, asking questions as to how economic futures can be predicted when facing an unprecedented global crisis.

Looking ahead, Slaughter offers a vision of the economy in 2020 and challenges companies and organizations, as well as individuals, to consider just how they will shape their own futures to survive in what will be a markedly different economic landscape.

    The U.S. and Global Economy: Near-Term Outlook
    Today the United States and other countries are emerging from the Great Recession and related capital markets crisis. But even if economic recovery is taking hold, there is unusually high uncertainty about its breadth and durability. In all countries, what economic strength there is, is due largely to massive government intervention to end the crisis. Central banks have printed trillions of dollars worth of new currencies, and fiscal authorities have increased spending and cut taxes by trillions of dollars more. This monetary and fiscal stimulus has clearly helped. But it is also clearly unsustainable. What forces can sustain economic recovery? What forces might restrain it? Are certain companies, industries and countries better positioned to lead a recovery? This talk does not provide a single set of omniscient answers guaranteed to be right. The recent crisis has laid bare how inherently difficult is economic forecasting is at all times—and especially now, amidst so many forces at play with few if any historical precedents.

    Instead, this speech provides framework for answering these and other pressing questions with probabilities and scenarios, all based on key facts and insights from recent history with a conversation about three alternative scenarios of recovery—strong, tepid or none. Indeed, many insights can be better gained by talking about the childhood-favorite Winnie the Pooh characters rather than about complicated mathematical models.

    The Long-Term Business Policy Challenges Facing the United States
    Today it appears that the United States and other major economies may be emerging from deep recession. A return to economic growth would be very welcome. But regardless of the near-term prognosis, the United States now faces a collection of business policy challenges the likes of which have not been seen since the Great Depression—if ever. Some challenges stem from the unprecedented actions taken by the U.S. government amidst the capital markets crisis and deep recession. Others stem from long-building pressures in the global economy that predate the recent crisis and persist beyond it. In particular, the size and scope of the government in the U.S. economy, the absence of widely shared economic growth, and the stagnation of American skills are of considerable concern.

    Whether and how the United States addresses these challenges—by choice or by the forced hand of international investors—will carry dramatic implications for America’s future vitality. Addressed creatively and constructively, these challenges will give way to strong productivity growth, rising average standards of living and continued global leadership. Ignored or addressed poorly, these challenges will give way to slow and poorly distributed growth, deeper political divides and an accelerated decline in America’s global stature. Focused on meeting these challenges and finding nonpartisan ways to overcome them, Matthew Slaughter helps business and civic leaders think strategically about the medium and long-term prospects for their organizations—and more generally what the future holds for their children and grandchildren.

    Global Economics 2020: What Vision Do You Have for Your Economic Future?
    The recent crisis in global capital markets and broader economy focused many business and civic leaders on the immediate term challenges of surviving to the next day, the next week, the next quarter. But as the crisis fortunately recedes, these leaders are again turning to consider the longer-term opportunities and challenges presented by the global economy. To successfully lead companies into the future, executives need to understand both the underlying economics at hand and also the strategies that can create truly global organizations in terms of customers, resources and talent and overall mindset.

    Two questions are central. One question is, How can you lead your firms amidst the challenges and opportunities presented by globalization? On both the revenue and the cost side of the ledger, globalization can have big impacts. The second question is, How should you lead your firms amidst the challenges and opportunities presented by globalization? Answers to these two questions might be very different. The should question cannot be answered without an answer to the can question, but answering the can alone is not sufficient. And answering these two questions is much harder today as the world continues to struggle with the ongoing capital markets crisis and deep recession. The global economic landscape in 2020 will be markedly different from today. This talk offers facts, frameworks and insightful examples to help business and civic leaders determine what vision they will bring to their organizations to formulate and implement a sustainable long-term strategy.





* Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

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    The U.S. and Global Economy: Near-Term Outlook
    Today the United States and other countries are emerging from the Great Recession and related capital markets crisis. But even if economic recovery is taking hold, there is unusually high uncertainty about its breadth and durability. In all countries, what economic strength there is, is due largely to massive government intervention to end the crisis. Central banks have printed trillions of dollars worth of new currencies, and fiscal authorities have increased spending and cut taxes by trillions of dollars more. This monetary and fiscal stimulus has clearly helped. But it is also clearly unsustainable. What forces can sustain economic recovery? What forces might restrain it? Are certain companies, industries and countries better positioned to lead a recovery? This talk does not provide a single set of omniscient answers guaranteed to be right. The recent crisis has laid bare how inherently difficult is economic forecasting is at all times—and especially now, amidst so many forces at play with few if any historical precedents.

    Instead, this speech provides framework for answering these and other pressing questions with probabilities and scenarios, all based on key facts and insights from recent history with a conversation about three alternative scenarios of recovery—strong, tepid or none. Indeed, many insights can be better gained by talking about the childhood-favorite Winnie the Pooh characters rather than about complicated mathematical models.

    The Long-Term Business Policy Challenges Facing the United States
    Today it appears that the United States and other major economies may be emerging from deep recession. A return to economic growth would be very welcome. But regardless of the near-term prognosis, the United States now faces a collection of business policy challenges the likes of which have not been seen since the Great Depression—if ever. Some challenges stem from the unprecedented actions taken by the U.S. government amidst the capital markets crisis and deep recession. Others stem from long-building pressures in the global economy that predate the recent crisis and persist beyond it. In particular, the size and scope of the government in the U.S. economy, the absence of widely shared economic growth, and the stagnation of American skills are of considerable concern.

    Whether and how the United States addresses these challenges—by choice or by the forced hand of international investors—will carry dramatic implications for America’s future vitality. Addressed creatively and constructively, these challenges will give way to strong productivity growth, rising average standards of living and continued global leadership. Ignored or addressed poorly, these challenges will give way to slow and poorly distributed growth, deeper political divides and an accelerated decline in America’s global stature. Focused on meeting these challenges and finding nonpartisan ways to overcome them, Matthew Slaughter helps business and civic leaders think strategically about the medium and long-term prospects for their organizations—and more generally what the future holds for their children and grandchildren.

    Global Economics 2020: What Vision Do You Have for Your Economic Future?
    The recent crisis in global capital markets and broader economy focused many business and civic leaders on the immediate term challenges of surviving to the next day, the next week, the next quarter. But as the crisis fortunately recedes, these leaders are again turning to consider the longer-term opportunities and challenges presented by the global economy. To successfully lead companies into the future, executives need to understand both the underlying economics at hand and also the strategies that can create truly global organizations in terms of customers, resources and talent and overall mindset.

    Two questions are central. One question is, How can you lead your firms amidst the challenges and opportunities presented by globalization? On both the revenue and the cost side of the ledger, globalization can have big impacts. The second question is, How should you lead your firms amidst the challenges and opportunities presented by globalization? Answers to these two questions might be very different. The should question cannot be answered without an answer to the can question, but answering the can alone is not sufficient. And answering these two questions is much harder today as the world continues to struggle with the ongoing capital markets crisis and deep recession. The global economic landscape in 2020 will be markedly different from today. This talk offers facts, frameworks and insightful examples to help business and civic leaders determine what vision they will bring to their organizations to formulate and implement a sustainable long-term strategy.



Demo Video


“One of the best ways to support job growth in small businesses is to promote job growth in large businesses,” Matthew J. Slaughter explains to a House Committee, giving his views on the ways in which the US economy can be supported through the financial crisis in an era of increasing globalization. “Multinationals enhance the US economy through capital investment…and good paying jobs.”