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Economist Marilyn Moon is one of the nation’s foremost authorities on Medicare, aging, consumer health issues, and healthcare financing. As Institute Fellow and director of the American Institutes for Research Center (AIR) on Aging, she keeps consumers, providers, and policy makers up-to-date on the latest issues and developments in health care.

From 2003 to 2013, she directed the Health Program at AIR, overseeing senior researchers, unit directors, and over 50 projects valued at a total of $75 million. Throughout her career, Moon has extensively researched and written on various aspects of healthcare policy and social insurance issues, particularly factors affecting the viability and societal benefits of Medicare, Medicaid, and social security. In the 1990s she became nationally known for her informative and insightful Washington Post column which focused on healthcare reform.

Moon has served on a number of boards for non-profit organizations, including the Medicare Rights Center and the National Academy of Social Insurance, and was chair of the Maryland Healthcare Commission from 2008 to 2012.

Full Profile

Marilyn Moon was Vice President and Director of the Health Program at the American Institutes for Research. A nationally-known expert on Medicare, she has also served as a Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute and as a public trustee for the Social Security and Medicare trust funds.

Dr. Moon continues to write extensively on health policy, both for the elderly and the population in general, and on social insurance issues. Her most recent book, Medicare: A Policy Primer, was published by the Urban Institute Press in 2006. From 1993 to 2000, Moon also wrote a periodic column for the Washington Post on health reform and health coverage issues.

She has served on a number of boards for non-profit organizations including the Medicare Rights Center and the National Academy of Social Insurance. Dr. Moon was chair of the Maryland Health Care Commission from 2008 to 2012. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Moon earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where her work focused on the health and economic status of the elderly. Previously, she has been an associate professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a senior analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, and the founding Director of the Public Policy Institute of the American Association of Retired Persons.

Marilyn Moon has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Topics Include:

  • Health Care Reform & Financing
  • Long Term Care
  • Aging and Health Care
  • Balancing Access and Costs


Marilyn Moon Speaker Videos Back to top

Speech Excerpt


Marilyn Moon makes the case that Social Security and Medicaid are still relevant and necessary today. Despite public surveys in which people claim the two social insurance programs play an insignificant role in their lives, she says that people’s actions tell a different story.

As people have faced times where they have been unemployed or underemployed, saving for retirement has not always been possible and people have had to fall back on such programs. While Moon addresses the idea that changing times call for doing things differently, she argues that this does not necessarily mean – as some suggest - that we should scrap our social insurance programs. She goes on to illustrate how policies could be adjusted so that programs would function more efficiently in our new reality.

Speech Excerpt



Speeches / Speaking Engagements Back to top


Economist and social insurance expert, Marilyn Moon delivers a holistic analysis of the current challenges and options we face as consumers, providers, and policy makers. She uncovers the value such programs have for our society, their economic impact, and feasible reforms that could strengthen Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security and even help mitigate America’s growing inequality gap. Using hard facts and figures, Moon debunks many faulty assumptions that inundate policy discussions and instead, crafts a credible picture of how possible changes would affect taxpayers and beneficiaries over time.




* Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

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Speech Excerpt


Marilyn Moon makes the case that Social Security and Medicaid are still relevant and necessary today. Despite public surveys in which people claim the two social insurance programs play an insignificant role in their lives, she says that people’s actions tell a different story.

As people have faced times where they have been unemployed or underemployed, saving for retirement has not always been possible and people have had to fall back on such programs. While Moon addresses the idea that changing times call for doing things differently, she argues that this does not necessarily mean – as some suggest - that we should scrap our social insurance programs. She goes on to illustrate how policies could be adjusted so that programs would function more efficiently in our new reality.

Speech Excerpt