[x]

CLIENT LOGIN: ADD SPEAKER TO FOLIO

Please enter your username and password below to add this speaker to your folio.


Tabs

In the new world of social media, organizations can use advertising to create viral ideas and products which spread contagiously across the marketplace. Professor Jonah Berger is an expert in these social memes; just what makes products, ideas and behaviors spread to popularity. He analyses how individual decision-making and collective dynamics create trends, and why certain products are more likely to get word-of-mouth recommendations and go viral online.

James G.Campbell Jr Associate Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, Professor Berger has been published in the most prestigious of academic journals, and his work has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, NPR, Science, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, Wired, BusinessWeek, The Atlantic and The Economist. New York Times Magazine featured his research in its “Year in Ideas" issue.

Professor Berger has received a number of awards for his work both as a scholar and teacher, including the Iron Professor Teaching Award and the MBA Curricular Innovation Award from the Wharton School.

Full Profile

What makes ideas viral and products spread contagiously? Professor Jonah Berger studies social epidemics, or how products, ideas, and behaviors catch on and become popular. He examines how individual decision making and social dynamics (e.g., social influence) between people generate collective outcomes such as social contagion and trends. Most recently, Professor Berger has examined why certain products get more word-of-mouth than others and why certain online content goes viral.

Jonah Berger is the James G. Campbell Jr. Associate Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He studies social influence and social epidemics, or how products, ideas, and behaviors catch on and become popular. His research has been published in top-tier academic journals, and popular accounts of his work have appeared in the New York TimesWall Street Journal, NPR, ScienceHarvard Business ReviewSloan Management ReviewWired, Business Week, The Atlantic, and The Economist. His research has also been featured in the New York Times Magazine’s “Year in Ideas.”

Berger has been recognized with a number of awards for both scholarship and teaching, including the Iron Professor Teaching Award and the MBA Curricular Innovation Award from the Wharton School. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Jonah Berger Speaker Videos Back to top

Jonah Berger: Contagious: Why Things Catch On


Professor Jonah Berger leads his audience on an investigation into his main field of study, which is why certain products or ideas catch on and take flight when others plummet. He asks, “Why do some products get talked about more than others? You probably heard that word-of-mouth is really important, it's more important than advertising, but to make it work we have to understand why some people talk about some things more than others."

Examining the potential for word-of-mouth marketing, he recounts a story of a publisher who sent him a copy of a book for review and also a spare copy, asking him to pass it on to a friend if he liked it. He explains, “That's the old sociological concept of homophily, we tend to be friends with people who are similar to us. If you like football, you tend to have friends who like football, if you like opera, you tend to have friends who like opera. If you like something, you probably know other people who like that thing as well, and that's the targeting benefit of word-of-mouth and social media more generally."

Relating this trend more closely to marketing, he says, “That's why the referral benefits are so useful, the customer lifetime value of customers referred through social networks is much higher than traditional customers because it helps people find the people who will be most interested."

Jonah Berger: DC Walking Summit


Speaking to the Walking Movement, Professor Jonah Berger outlines his area of interest: “I've spent the last decade studying how social influence and word-of-mouth work, and I want to spend the next 30 to 40 minutes with you guys thinking about and beginning to think about how we can apply this to the walking movement."

Taking an example from his own workplace, Professor Berger explains how ideas can be transmitted through simple subliminal messages. He says, “I bike to work, and I keep my bike in my office. One of my colleagues started biking to work… he comes into our offices once in a while, and he sees bikes, and that reminds him that lots of other people are biking, and eventually it got him to decide to bike in himself."

This raises questions, as Professor Berger explains: “The question is, how can simple things, in this case having a bike in the office, rather than downstairs, by making behavior more public, can we make things catch on? Because lots of people want to walk and want to be healthier, but thinking about what others are doing is a big driver of what we do."

Jonah Berger at SxSW: Contagious Content


According to marketing professor Jonah Berger, “Contagious content is not luck or chance. There really is a science behind it.” Then he tells about the 10 years he and his team studied thousands of articles, brands and products to see what makes something go viral or get talked about. “After our study, I can reliably say there’s a formula for why things catch on. The six key steps are psychological drivers for why we share things.” Those steps are outlined both in his book, Contagious: Why Things Catch On, and in his presentations.





* Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

Share

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Google Plus

Top25 Speaker Voting

Jonah Berger needs 21 vote(s) to make it into the Top 25 speakers on Speaking.com!


Speaker Booking Tip

“Tip: ask your speaker to do a book signing or attend a VIP meal with your guests. ”

For Event Planners



Keynote Speaker Booking Toolkit.
Booking a Celebrity Speaker.
How to Find and Book the Right Speaker.
Google+ Event Planning Forum.
Tips for International Clients Booking U.S. Based Speakers.


Similar Speakers

  • Kevin Roberts Worldwide CEO of the world's most famous advertising firm, Saatchi & Saatchi, Kevin Roberts has led the company to record financial success and outstanding international…
  • Adam Grant Adam Grant is Wharton's youngest full professor and top-rated teacher. He is the author of Give and Take, a New York Times and Wall Street…
  • Travis Bradberry Dr. Travis Bradberry was awarded his BSC in Clinical Psychology by the University of California, San Diego, and holds a dual PhD in clinical and…

SPEAKING.com Testimonials

Mattel

Our client rep was a pleasure to work with. He was well organized and kept me updated every step of the way. The level of professionalism and the quality of the materials received were excellent. I will be in touch for future speakers!

Mattel



About SPEAKING.com

Established in 1994, we are exclusive agents for some of the world's leading experts, celebrities and professional speakers.

We offer event planners a fully staffed speaker logistics planning team, plus a personal SPEAKING.com Account Executive – a knowledgeable and trustworthy partner. We guarantee your satisfaction with your speaker and a smooth booking process.

Contact us today to book your favorite speaker.



Contagious

Contagious: Why Things Catch On
What makes things popular?

If you said advertising, think again. People don’t listen to advertisements, they listen to their peers. But why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumors more infectious? And what makes online content go viral?

Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger has spent the last decade answering these questions. He’s studied why New York Times articles make the paper’s own Most E-mailed List, why products get word of mouth, and how social influence shapes everything from the cars we buy to the clothes we wear to the names we give our children. In this book, Berger reveals the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission. Discover how six basic principles drive all sorts of things to become contagious, from consumer products and policy initiatives to workplace rumors and YouTube videos.

Contagious combines groundbreaking research with powerful stories. Learn how a luxury steakhouse found popularity through the lowly cheese-steak, why anti-drug commercials might have actually increased drug use, and why more than 200 million consumers shared a video about one of the seemingly most boring products there is: a blender. If you’ve wondered why certain stories get shared, e-mails get forwarded, or videos go viral, Contagious explains why, and shows how to leverage these concepts to craft contagious content. This book provides a set of specific, actionable techniques for helping information spread—for designing messages, advertisements, and information that people will share. Whether you’re a manager at a big company, a small business owner trying to boost awareness, a politician running for office, or a health official trying to get the word out, Contagious will show you how to make your product or idea catch on.



Jonah Berger: Contagious: Why Things Catch On


Professor Jonah Berger leads his audience on an investigation into his main field of study, which is why certain products or ideas catch on and take flight when others plummet. He asks, “Why do some products get talked about more than others? You probably heard that word-of-mouth is really important, it's more important than advertising, but to make it work we have to understand why some people talk about some things more than others."

Examining the potential for word-of-mouth marketing, he recounts a story of a publisher who sent him a copy of a book for review and also a spare copy, asking him to pass it on to a friend if he liked it. He explains, “That's the old sociological concept of homophily, we tend to be friends with people who are similar to us. If you like football, you tend to have friends who like football, if you like opera, you tend to have friends who like opera. If you like something, you probably know other people who like that thing as well, and that's the targeting benefit of word-of-mouth and social media more generally."

Relating this trend more closely to marketing, he says, “That's why the referral benefits are so useful, the customer lifetime value of customers referred through social networks is much higher than traditional customers because it helps people find the people who will be most interested."

Jonah Berger: DC Walking Summit


Speaking to the Walking Movement, Professor Jonah Berger outlines his area of interest: “I've spent the last decade studying how social influence and word-of-mouth work, and I want to spend the next 30 to 40 minutes with you guys thinking about and beginning to think about how we can apply this to the walking movement."

Taking an example from his own workplace, Professor Berger explains how ideas can be transmitted through simple subliminal messages. He says, “I bike to work, and I keep my bike in my office. One of my colleagues started biking to work… he comes into our offices once in a while, and he sees bikes, and that reminds him that lots of other people are biking, and eventually it got him to decide to bike in himself."

This raises questions, as Professor Berger explains: “The question is, how can simple things, in this case having a bike in the office, rather than downstairs, by making behavior more public, can we make things catch on? Because lots of people want to walk and want to be healthier, but thinking about what others are doing is a big driver of what we do."

Jonah Berger at SxSW: Contagious Content


According to marketing professor Jonah Berger, “Contagious content is not luck or chance. There really is a science behind it.” Then he tells about the 10 years he and his team studied thousands of articles, brands and products to see what makes something go viral or get talked about. “After our study, I can reliably say there’s a formula for why things catch on. The six key steps are psychological drivers for why we share things.” Those steps are outlined both in his book, Contagious: Why Things Catch On, and in his presentations.