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Hundreds of organizations have turned to Harry G. Broadman for his vast geographical expertise and experience in multinational corporate strategy and operations. For over 35 years, the economic advisor has guided businesses and investors through the risks and opportunities of foreign markets and the political and cultural challenges that correspond. He has played a prominent role in the formulation and execution of many of the most critical global business and economic policy decisions of our time.

Broadman is the CEO and Managing Partner of Proa Global Partners LLC, a global business strategy and investment advisory firm that develops and helps execute innovative approaches to capitalize on ‘first mover’ opportunities in emerging markets while mitigating commercial, corruption, and reputational risks. Concurrently, he is Director of the Council on Global Enterprise and Emerging Markets at John Hopkins University, as well as a Senior Fellow at the university's Foreign Policy Institute.

Prior to his current roles, Broadman accumulated decades of expertise in numerous industries in an extensive range of political a environments and cultures, including every developed nation, Russia, China, India, the Middle East, many parts of Latin America, and half of Africa's 49 countries. His thoughts and insights are frequently published in a wide array of peer-reviewed economics, foreign policy and law journals.

Broadman has held a variety of advisory and leadership positions at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Albright Capital Management LLC, and The World Bank Group. At PWC, he founded and led PwC’s Management Consulting Emerging Markets Business Strategy Practice, which realized US$7 million in global annual fees and encompassed more than 25 professionals around the world. In addition to his work in the private sector, he served as Chief of Staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers.

Full Profile

Building on his thirty-five year career in international banking and finance; private equity investment; negotiation of foreign investment and trade agreements; corporate and public sector governance reform; and senior-level policy-making and enforcement positions in the executive and legislative branches of government, Harry Broadman recently became CEO and Managing Partner of Proa Global Partners LLC, a global business strategy and investment advisory firm that develops and helps execute innovative approaches to capitalize on ‘first mover’ opportunities in emerging markets while mitigating commercial, corruption, and reputational risks. The firm’s clients include corporations, investment banks, private equity firms, sovereign wealth funds, multilateral financial institutions, and professional services firms.

Concurrently, Broadman joined the Faculty of Johns Hopkins University, where he is Director of the Council on Global Enterprise and Emerging Markets—a new practitioner-centered, independent, non-partisan forum for senior executives from around the world to candidly discuss how to best structure business alliances—at the graduate School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington DC. He is also a Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins’ Foreign Policy Institute.

He is also extensively engaged as a Keynote Speaker, unbundling the fundamental drivers of prospective global market opportunities and investment risks, and sharing operational insights from emergent strategies being undertaken by high-performing businesses in emerging markets. His audiences are typically senior executives and officials in the private- and public-sectors around the world.

In addition, Broadman is a Monthly Columnist for Forbes; Newsweek (Japan); and Gulf News, where he writes on the intersection of global business and public policy.

He serves in several Non-Executive Board of Director roles, including on the Board of Directors of the Corporate Council on Africa and the Board of Directors of Partners for Democratic Change. He is also on the Board of Advisors of the Global Business School Network, and the Board of Advisors of The Lake Tanganyika Floating Health Clinic.

Broadman has published several books and authored numerous professional articles published in a wide array of peer-reviewed economics, foreign policy and law journals. His two most recent books are: Africa’s Silk Road: China and India’s New Economic Frontier and From Disintegration to Reintegration: Russia and the Former Soviet Union.

He is a life-time Member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a Member of the Bretton Woods Committee.

Throughout his career Broadman has developed deep practitioner expertise in a number of operational specialties: the design and diagnostics of multinational corporate strategy; supply chain management and market integration efficiencies; cross-border deal origination and capital-raising; anti-corruption, compliance and reputational due diligence strategies; innovative approaches to asset allocation and development of performance metrics; competitive market intelligence; formation of strategic alliances, public-private-partnerships and CSR initiatives; antitrust and competition policy reform; project finance; corporate governance reform; and economic development policy.

Broadman’s professional experience spans a variety of industry sectors, including finance, banking and insurance; oil & gas and minerals; non-fossil fuel energy & natural resources; a broad set of industries in the services sectors, especially telecommunications, aviation, shipping and ports, rail, trucking, construction, entertainment; capital-intensive manufacturing; and light industrial products, such as pharmaceuticals, textiles and consumer goods; and regulated infrastructure utilities.

He has worked at the field-level in geographical diverse settings across the globe, including not only all of the advanced countries, but also, with few exceptions, in most emerging markets: Africa; China; India; Russia and the CIS; Eastern and Central Europe; the Balkans; Brazil and much of Latin America; almost all of East Asia, including Myanmar; and parts of the Middle East.

In late 2015 Broadman stepped down as Senior Managing Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), where he founded and led PwC’s Management Consulting Emerging Markets Business Strategy Practice, which realized US$7 million in global annual fees and encompassed more than 25 professionals around the world. He also served as PwC’s Chief Economist.

Prior to PwC, Broadman was Managing Director and served on the Investment Committee at Albright Capital Management LLC, a private equity and alternative strategy investment fund focused exclusively on emerging markets. He was also Managing Director at Albright Stonebridge Group, a global consultancy chaired by former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.

Previously, Broadman was a senior official at the World Bank Group, where he negotiated and executed some of the Bank Group’s largest loan operations, including those in China and East Asia; Russia and the CIS; the Balkans; and sub-Saharan Africa.

Before joining the Bank Group, he served in the Executive Office of the President as US Assistant Trade Representative, where he oversaw all US negotiations on international trade and investment in the services sectors in the creation of both NAFTA and the WTO, including the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS); led all negotiations of US Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs); sat on the Board of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC); and served on the White House Committee on Foreign Investment in the US (CFIUS).

Earlier, Broadman served in the White House as Chief of Staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers and on Capitol Hill as Chief Economist for the U.S. Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, then chaired by Senator John Glenn.

Prior to those appointments, Broadman was Assistant Director of Resources for the Future, Inc.; Consultant at the Rand Corporation; Fellow at the Brookings Institution; and on the faculties of Harvard University and Johns Hopkins University.

Broadman received an A.B. in economics and history, magna cum laude, from Brown University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and an A.M. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.


Harry Broadman Speaker Videos Back to top

Harry Broadman, Global Economic Expert: Round Table Discussion


Calling back to economic trends in China in the 1990s and Russia in the early 2000s, global economist Harry Broadman makes the case that African economies are the hot spots that investors should be watching. Acknowledging that we should keep in mind that Africa is a highly heterogenous continent comprised of over 40 different countries, he notes that nevertheless, it cannot be ignored that overall growth rates for the region have been consistently above 5% in the last 15 years.

"We in the U.S. and the E.U. would die to have that kind of growth record," he puts Africa's GDP into perspective before continuing to outline that factors that are driving numerous countries on the subcontinent to reach inflection points.

Harry Broadman: Council on Foreign Relations, Panel on Brazil's Economic Future


Harry Broadman, Global Economic Expert: Keynote, Opportunities and Risks in Mining



Speeches / Speaking Engagements Back to top


For 35 years Dr. Harry G. Broadman has been prominently at the vanguard of the formulation and execution of many of the most critical global business and economic policy decisions of our time. Dr. Broadman delivers exceptionally stimulating insights drawing on the rich mosaic of his high-level practitioner experiences, coupled with his record as an ingenious thought-leader, widely-cited book author, and globally sought-after speaker.

Broadman offers a unique, compelling, entertaining, and often provocative point of view—which the National Journal recently referred to as “the Broadman School of Economics.” His in-depth programs reveal the opportunities and risks in today’s international markets and how you can capitalize on them.

Where Is the Growth in the World Economy?
The recent global financial crisis and the ongoing softness in much of the advanced countries—the EU, Japan and the U.S.—have shaken businesses’, investors’ and policymakers’ perceptions and confidence of a return to historic levels of stable growth. The fact that many emerging markets have been growing at annual rates two to three times those of the industrialized economies over the past two decades appears to confirm that the world marketplace is actually undergoing a structural transformation.

What are the fundamental sources of these phenomena? Is this a one-time change, owning to a longer than normal business cycle that has yet to run its full course, or is it part of a long-term secular change? What new risks and opportunities are presented? Harry Broadman’s on-the-ground insights about the genesis and implications of these shifts—and his surprising bullish view—will alter how audiences think about the future of the U.S. and the world economies and will shape the decisions they make.

Why the Sudden Interest in Doing Business in Africa?
Over the past several years, interest in Africa as a destination for investment has been growing at a startling clip. A few niche private equity firms were the first to make serious inroads into the continent more than a decade ago. Now, a growing number of multinational corporations and the largest private equity firms, as well as a variety of other institutional investors, have “discovered” Africa.

Still, too few business leaders and policymakers in the U.S., the EU and other advanced countries are aware that for the past two decades, much of sub-Saharan Africa has been enjoying a relatively uninterrupted period of robust growth, where, on average, there’s been an annual increase in gross domestic product (GDP) of more than five percent over those 20 years. Moreover, while most investors, economists and policymakers forecast that Africa would suffer the greatest economic damage from the recent global financial crisis, the exact opposite was the case: pound for pound, the continent proved to be the most resilient region of the world economy.

What’s behind the excitement over Africa? Is it a real opportunity or just the investment du jour? How are investors coping with the risks? And how do those risks compare with other regions of the world? Given the vast size, the large number and the heterogeneity of the countries on the continent, how do businesses and investors determine which ones are the standouts and which ones to avoid?

Having spent time in more than half of the number of African states, Harry Broadman speaks authoritatively about the prospects for Africa’s long-term growth, the use of innovative approaches for mitigating risks, and how to assess and capitalize on new market opportunities on the continent. Broadman reveals pivotal developments and trends taking place in a number of African countries that disrupt long-held views about doing business in the region.

Is China Really Destined To Be an Economic Powerhouse?
The conventional wisdom on Wall Street, inside the Capital Beltway, in the union hall and throughout the shopping mall is that it is inevitable that China will soon dominate the global economy. While at present, doubts are voiced due to the current slowdown in China’s output and the bubble in its real-estate sector, at the fundamental level those concerns are widely seen as temporary speed bumps in China’s inexorable march to be the world’s economic captain. A deeper understanding of the underlying structure and functioning of Chinese banks and enterprises, the framework governing policymaking in Beijing, the arc of the Communist Party’s stronghold over the economy, and the nexus of environmental, health and social challenges affords a different perspective.

What are China’s real economic and policy risks? What role does the absence of democracy in the country play in China’s economic fortunes? How much has the Chinese economy in fact changed since the advent of reform in 1978? Where are there opportunities for China’s long-term growth? Harry Broadman, who has worked throughout China at the field level since 1993, will excite audiences with this fresh perspective on the trajectory of China’s economic destiny.

Managing Overseas Corruption Risks
Corruption is one of the most pervasive and pernicious risks facing corporations, banks, private equity funds and other investors in the international marketplace. Not only can corruption add sizeable costs to the bottom line and damage reputations and brand images for many years, it can also result in very serious criminal penalties, including imprisonment and very large fines. Despite the fact that an increasing number of governments have been either strengthening existing sanctions against corruption or establishing wholly new anti-corruption regimes, rarely, it seems, does a month go by without the appearance of a news headline about a firm being charged with involvement in corrupt activities.

At the same time, businesses often complain about the fact that because their rivals are not being held to the same corruption standards, unfair competitive advantages are being created, or that anti-corruption authorities don’t understand that for some cultures, certain business practices are not deemed as corruption but as traditional ways to carry out commerce.

Drawing on his considerable experience counseling businesses on structuring corruption de-risking strategies as well as advising governments on the design and execution of anti-corruption reform programs, Harry Broadman shares his insights on the “dos and don’ts” and best practice approaches to mitigating the risk of corruption in foreign markets.

Harry Broadman will address:

  • What are the various laws, regulations and enforcement institutions both at home and in key markets abroad most pertinent to corruption issues?
  • What are the most effective strategies for combatting incipient corruption?
  • What options are available to deal with competitors who are seemingly immune to corruption sanctions?
  • How should a business’s compliance practices be designed and implemented?
  • How can individuals or entities who are likely to present corruption vulnerabilities be systematically identified through due diligence at the very outset?
  • What are the most effective responses to the discovery of corrupt activities?
  • Which remedial steps are likely to have the largest payoffs?
Broadman offers a window on the trends in the incidence of and responses to corruption in key foreign markets, e.g., China and Russia, and giving audiences the means to operate safely and successfully in the international arena.

Understanding U.S. Trade Policy: Past, Present and Future
To most Americans, negotiating and implementing international trade policy agreements is an enigma, which often breeds suspicion if not contempt for the process. Much is at stake for millions of U.S. businesses, workers and consumers. Demystifying the policymaking process, the institutions, the politics and the interrelationships among the stakeholders, both within the U.S. and our trading partners abroad, is essential to gain a better understanding of what are the benefits as well as the costs of various trade initiatives—past, present and prospective.

With the overwhelming majority of the world’s customers located outside the U.S.—if not outside most advanced countries—trade is hardly only important to large businesses: small and medium-sized companies need to develop a strong understanding of international trade rules and opportunities in order to succeed in a global marketplace.

Harry Broadman will address:

  • How is trade policy actually developed in the U.S.?
  • Who are the key parties that influence how those decisions are crafted?
  • How likely will a change in presidential administration engender a shift in the stance of U.S. trade policy in such a way that there could be profound impacts on companies, workers and consumers—not just in the U.S. but also throughout the world?
  • What are the indicators to look for when trying to determine which direction trade policy is headed—particularly with a change of administrations in 2017?
A former senior-level trade negotiator in both the Bush (41) and Clinton White Houses, as well as a drafter of key trade legislation while a senior staff member in the Senate, Harry Broadman shares a ringside seat overview of the decision-making process in Washington behind recent trade policy initiatives, including the negotiation of NAFTA and the WTO. He also highlights the trade challenges of the future, with respect to China and other major trading powers, and offers his insights on effective ways to take advantage (and avoid the pitfalls) of trade agreements as businesses operate abroad.

Other Recent Speaking Topics:

  • Just Where is The Growth in the World Economy?
  • Is China Really Destined to be an Economic Powerhouse?
  • Are You Ready for the New Global Corporate Rivals?
  • Do Corporate Social Responsibility Programs Really Pay Off?
  • Innovative Management of Overseas Corruption Risks
  • Is Putin Recreating the Soviet Empire?
  • Why the Sudden Interest in Doing Business in Africa?
  • What is the Future of Global Trade Agreements?




* Please note that while this speaker’s specific speaking fee falls within the range posted above (for Continental U.S. based events), fees are subject to change. For current fee information or international event fees (which are generally 50-75% more than U.S based event fees), please contact us.

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Africa's Silk Road
China and India's new-found interest in trade and investment with Africa - home to 300 million of the globe's poorest people and the world's most formidable development challenge - presents a significant opportunity for growth and integration of theSub-Saharan continent into the global economy. Africa's Silk Road finds that China and India's South-South commerce with Africa is about far more than natural resources, opening the way for Africa to become a processor of commodities and a competitive supplier of goods and services to these countries - a major departure from its long established relations with the North.

A growing number of Chinese and Indian businesses active in Africa operate on a global scale, work with world-class technologies, produce products and services according to the most demanding standards, and foster the integration of African businesses into advanced markets.There are significant imbalances, however, in these emerging commercial relationships. These can be addressed through a series of reforms in all countries:

  • 'At-the-border' reforms, such as elimination of China and India's escalating tariffs on Africa's leading exports, and elimination of Africa's tariffs on certain inputs that make exports uncompetitive.
  • 'Behind-the-border' reforms in Africa, to unleash competitive market forces and strengthen its basic market institutions.
  • 'Between-the-border' improvements in trade facilitation mechanisms to decrease transactions costs.
  • Reforms that leverage linkages between investment and trade, to allow African businesses to participate in global production networks that investments by Chinese and Indian firms can generate.
Where Is the Growth in the World Economy?
The recent global financial crisis and the ongoing softness in much of the advanced countries—the EU, Japan and the U.S.—have shaken businesses’, investors’ and policymakers’ perceptions and confidence of a return to historic levels of stable growth. The fact that many emerging markets have been growing at annual rates two to three times those of the industrialized economies over the past two decades appears to confirm that the world marketplace is actually undergoing a structural transformation.

What are the fundamental sources of these phenomena? Is this a one-time change, owning to a longer than normal business cycle that has yet to run its full course, or is it part of a long-term secular change? What new risks and opportunities are presented? Harry Broadman’s on-the-ground insights about the genesis and implications of these shifts—and his surprising bullish view—will alter how audiences think about the future of the U.S. and the world economies and will shape the decisions they make.

Why the Sudden Interest in Doing Business in Africa?
Over the past several years, interest in Africa as a destination for investment has been growing at a startling clip. A few niche private equity firms were the first to make serious inroads into the continent more than a decade ago. Now, a growing number of multinational corporations and the largest private equity firms, as well as a variety of other institutional investors, have “discovered” Africa.

Still, too few business leaders and policymakers in the U.S., the EU and other advanced countries are aware that for the past two decades, much of sub-Saharan Africa has been enjoying a relatively uninterrupted period of robust growth, where, on average, there’s been an annual increase in gross domestic product (GDP) of more than five percent over those 20 years. Moreover, while most investors, economists and policymakers forecast that Africa would suffer the greatest economic damage from the recent global financial crisis, the exact opposite was the case: pound for pound, the continent proved to be the most resilient region of the world economy.

What’s behind the excitement over Africa? Is it a real opportunity or just the investment du jour? How are investors coping with the risks? And how do those risks compare with other regions of the world? Given the vast size, the large number and the heterogeneity of the countries on the continent, how do businesses and investors determine which ones are the standouts and which ones to avoid?

Having spent time in more than half of the number of African states, Harry Broadman speaks authoritatively about the prospects for Africa’s long-term growth, the use of innovative approaches for mitigating risks, and how to assess and capitalize on new market opportunities on the continent. Broadman reveals pivotal developments and trends taking place in a number of African countries that disrupt long-held views about doing business in the region.

Is China Really Destined To Be an Economic Powerhouse?
The conventional wisdom on Wall Street, inside the Capital Beltway, in the union hall and throughout the shopping mall is that it is inevitable that China will soon dominate the global economy. While at present, doubts are voiced due to the current slowdown in China’s output and the bubble in its real-estate sector, at the fundamental level those concerns are widely seen as temporary speed bumps in China’s inexorable march to be the world’s economic captain. A deeper understanding of the underlying structure and functioning of Chinese banks and enterprises, the framework governing policymaking in Beijing, the arc of the Communist Party’s stronghold over the economy, and the nexus of environmental, health and social challenges affords a different perspective.

What are China’s real economic and policy risks? What role does the absence of democracy in the country play in China’s economic fortunes? How much has the Chinese economy in fact changed since the advent of reform in 1978? Where are there opportunities for China’s long-term growth? Harry Broadman, who has worked throughout China at the field level since 1993, will excite audiences with this fresh perspective on the trajectory of China’s economic destiny.

Managing Overseas Corruption Risks
Corruption is one of the most pervasive and pernicious risks facing corporations, banks, private equity funds and other investors in the international marketplace. Not only can corruption add sizeable costs to the bottom line and damage reputations and brand images for many years, it can also result in very serious criminal penalties, including imprisonment and very large fines. Despite the fact that an increasing number of governments have been either strengthening existing sanctions against corruption or establishing wholly new anti-corruption regimes, rarely, it seems, does a month go by without the appearance of a news headline about a firm being charged with involvement in corrupt activities.

At the same time, businesses often complain about the fact that because their rivals are not being held to the same corruption standards, unfair competitive advantages are being created, or that anti-corruption authorities don’t understand that for some cultures, certain business practices are not deemed as corruption but as traditional ways to carry out commerce.

Drawing on his considerable experience counseling businesses on structuring corruption de-risking strategies as well as advising governments on the design and execution of anti-corruption reform programs, Harry Broadman shares his insights on the “dos and don’ts” and best practice approaches to mitigating the risk of corruption in foreign markets.

Harry Broadman will address:

  • What are the various laws, regulations and enforcement institutions both at home and in key markets abroad most pertinent to corruption issues?
  • What are the most effective strategies for combatting incipient corruption?
  • What options are available to deal with competitors who are seemingly immune to corruption sanctions?
  • How should a business’s compliance practices be designed and implemented?
  • How can individuals or entities who are likely to present corruption vulnerabilities be systematically identified through due diligence at the very outset?
  • What are the most effective responses to the discovery of corrupt activities?
  • Which remedial steps are likely to have the largest payoffs?
Broadman offers a window on the trends in the incidence of and responses to corruption in key foreign markets, e.g., China and Russia, and giving audiences the means to operate safely and successfully in the international arena.

Understanding U.S. Trade Policy: Past, Present and Future
To most Americans, negotiating and implementing international trade policy agreements is an enigma, which often breeds suspicion if not contempt for the process. Much is at stake for millions of U.S. businesses, workers and consumers. Demystifying the policymaking process, the institutions, the politics and the interrelationships among the stakeholders, both within the U.S. and our trading partners abroad, is essential to gain a better understanding of what are the benefits as well as the costs of various trade initiatives—past, present and prospective.

With the overwhelming majority of the world’s customers located outside the U.S.—if not outside most advanced countries—trade is hardly only important to large businesses: small and medium-sized companies need to develop a strong understanding of international trade rules and opportunities in order to succeed in a global marketplace.

Harry Broadman will address:

  • How is trade policy actually developed in the U.S.?
  • Who are the key parties that influence how those decisions are crafted?
  • How likely will a change in presidential administration engender a shift in the stance of U.S. trade policy in such a way that there could be profound impacts on companies, workers and consumers—not just in the U.S. but also throughout the world?
  • What are the indicators to look for when trying to determine which direction trade policy is headed—particularly with a change of administrations in 2017?
A former senior-level trade negotiator in both the Bush (41) and Clinton White Houses, as well as a drafter of key trade legislation while a senior staff member in the Senate, Harry Broadman shares a ringside seat overview of the decision-making process in Washington behind recent trade policy initiatives, including the negotiation of NAFTA and the WTO. He also highlights the trade challenges of the future, with respect to China and other major trading powers, and offers his insights on effective ways to take advantage (and avoid the pitfalls) of trade agreements as businesses operate abroad.

Other Recent Speaking Topics:

  • Just Where is The Growth in the World Economy?
  • Is China Really Destined to be an Economic Powerhouse?
  • Are You Ready for the New Global Corporate Rivals?
  • Do Corporate Social Responsibility Programs Really Pay Off?
  • Innovative Management of Overseas Corruption Risks
  • Is Putin Recreating the Soviet Empire?
  • Why the Sudden Interest in Doing Business in Africa?
  • What is the Future of Global Trade Agreements?


Harry Broadman, Global Economic Expert: Round Table Discussion


Calling back to economic trends in China in the 1990s and Russia in the early 2000s, global economist Harry Broadman makes the case that African economies are the hot spots that investors should be watching. Acknowledging that we should keep in mind that Africa is a highly heterogenous continent comprised of over 40 different countries, he notes that nevertheless, it cannot be ignored that overall growth rates for the region have been consistently above 5% in the last 15 years.

"We in the U.S. and the E.U. would die to have that kind of growth record," he puts Africa's GDP into perspective before continuing to outline that factors that are driving numerous countries on the subcontinent to reach inflection points.

Harry Broadman: Council on Foreign Relations, Panel on Brazil's Economic Future


Harry Broadman, Global Economic Expert: Keynote, Opportunities and Risks in Mining